What if Sarah Palin is the parody?

by lestro

This past weekend on SNL, Tina Fey once again parodied Sarah Palin, this time using Palin’s actual responses from the now infamous Katie Couric interview.

But what if Sarah Palin really is a parody?

What if this is all just a crazy character and she’s working us all, like Borat or Andy Kaufman?

Think about it in pure stereotypical, demographic, Hollywood terms:

A former beauty queen from a small town in Alaska who marries a half-Native snow mobile champ; She’s a born-again young-earth creationist who is blessed by a witch-hunter and believes the Flintstones are real; She has five kids, including the oldest (named Track) in the military, and her pregnant, unwed teenage daughter planning a wedding; Palin wins mayor on big, national, wedge issues; She goes on to governor, where she gets deep into a scandal that started with a sister in a bad divorce with a state trooper.

Then she was picked out of obscurity and thrown onto the Republican ticket at a time when the country is in the middle of two wars and struggling with a floundering economy.

What a great bio. You couldn’t write that. No one would believe it.

Now factor in her performances; the way she is good with a script and with catch phrases and seems to be improvising in interviews. It’s almost like ‘how far can I take this?

What if she’s just locked in the punch?

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CNN vs. SNL

by twit

or, “Sarah Palin vs. Sarah Palin”

It’s the first time Wolf Blitzer has ever heard SNL parody use exactly the same words…

via the Viral Video Chart

Live From The Campaign Trail, It’s Saturday Night!

by lestro

Every four years or so, one television show manages to shake off the “not as good as it used to be” detractors and once again become the single most relevant 90 minutes on network television: Saturday Night Live.

Even with the rise of cable television, “The Daily Show” and YouTube, SNL remains THE place to go for political satire, especially during election years.

On the air for almost 35 years, the show has lampooned politics and presidents since Chevy Chase fell down stairs as a clutzy, slightly confused Gerald Ford, forever locking in the idea that Ford himself – a collegiate football star with two national championships to his name – was a clutz.

For me, SNL’s political hook was set back with Phil Hartman playing a totally-in-control Reagan organizing his political machine until it was time to play dumb for a photo with a girl scout. My most distinct memory of the 1988 election was the debate between Dana Carvey’s hysterically twitchy George H.W. Bush and Jon Lovitz’s confused and very short Michael Dukakis. During the debate, Lovitz used a lift to raise himself behind the podium and then, after Carvey repeated “thousand points of light” for his entire response, uttered one of my favorite lines ever: “I can’t believe I’m losing to this guy.”

During the first Gulf war, Carvey’s Bush opened the show from the Oval Office almost every week, warning Saddam Hussein about the impending attack and then gloating when it was over.

During 1992, Carvey did double duty in the debates, playing both the president and Texas wackadoo businessman Ross Perot, while Phil Hartman’s Bill Clinton ran away with the oval office, with a memorable jogging trip to a McDonald’s in one sketch and the line “there’s gonna be a whole bunch of things we don’t tell Mrs. Clinton. Fast food is the least of our worries”.

Despite left-leaning writers and performers, the show more than anything skewers power. During the Clinton years, he got it pretty good, especially during the Lewinsky scandal in 1998. The season premiere that year opened with a sketch set on an Oprah show of the future, reuniting the cast of the Clinton Scandal to talk about the incident (Hillary, in the sketch, was a crunchy hippie-esque lesbian. John Goodman played Linda Tripp). Later in the episode, the Ladies Man and host Cameron Diaz offered advice to the President on how to get rid of unwanted interns once they were done “mouthifying his wang”:

“Yeah, that’s nice. Now how ’bout you be going?”

In 2000, Will Ferrell’s George Bush became the most popular character on the show, so popular in fact that last week on Nightline, while plugging his new movie, Ferrell was asked if he takes any responsibility for the Bush victory because people liked his impression of Bush so much. The best moment of that election season was a debate sketch in which Tim Russert asked each candidate to sum up their campaign in one word. Gore responded “Lockbox,” while Bush gave us a new word, one that has stuck with us since: “Strategery.”

After Sept. 11, 2001, Saturday Night Live’s first live episode featured Mayor Rudy Guiliani (a regular guest during his time in Gracie Mansion) and members of the NYPD and NYFD during the cold opening. When Lorne Michaels asked Rudy if they could be funny, Rudy responded “Why start now?” and SNL was back.

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monday cartoons

by twit

Rampant technical issues prevent embedding videos for reasons beyond the twit’s comprehension. Videos are available at the links.

From the Raw Story on Feb 25, 2008:

Sen. Hillary Clinton blames some of her presidential woes in part on unfair press coverage but said she believed Obama had come under increased media scrutiny in recent days.On Sunday, she urged donors to watch the latest episode of Saturday Night Live, which featured a skit mocking last Thursday’s CNN debate as little more than a love fest for Obama.

Video at this link. Additional videos of SNL sketches from the episode are available here, including Tina Fey’s “Bitch is the New Black” sketch.

The twit’s first response was ‘aaiiigh!’ but then she saw the video and how it really, really makes fun of Hillary, her string of losses and her unified lack of popularity. Her endorsement of the video because of its extreme depictions of the media is so out of touch it boggles the twit’s mind.

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