It’s a turn-around jump shot

by twit

It’s everybody jump start

The Obama administration reversed years of U.S. policy Monday by calling for a treaty to cut mercury pollution, which it described as the world’s gravest chemical problem.

It’s every generation throws a hero up the pop charts

The statement represented a “180-degree turnaround” from policy under the Bush administration, said Michael Bender, co-coordinator of the Zero Mercury Working Group, a global coalition of 75 environmental organizations working to reduce mercury exposure.

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Burma on fire

by twit

Another day, another outrage, another reason for war.

From the BBC on May 30, 2008, there are reports from Myanmar indicating:

Burma’s military government had begun to evict homeless families from some government-run emergency camps.

It has given them bamboo poles and tarpaulins and told them to go and rebuild their lives, say reports.

An estimated 2.4m people remain homeless and hungry following Cyclone Nargis, which struck on 2 May.

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The Invasion of Burma

by twit

can begin now. From the BBC on May 20, 2008:

The UK National Health Service emergency medicine consultant says 5,000 sq km (1,900 sq miles) of land in the region remain under water.

map

but via M&C, by way of Slog on May 22, 2008:

Bangkok – Myanmar’s junta claims the relief phase of an emergency programme for Cyclone Nargis is over…

While international aid agencies claim to have only reached 25 per cent of the affected population, Myanmar’s junta is already claiming that the ‘rescue and relief’ stage of the operation is completed

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The Battle for Burma

by twit

While the current scope of government-facilitated death and destruction fails to move the world to further action than what the Burma junta permits, the situation is predicted as about to change dramatically for the worse.

From the Guardian on May 14, 2008:

Weather experts said there was a good chance the tropical depression in the Bay of Bengal could develop into a “significant” cyclone within the next 24 hours.

There is no doubt at this point that Burma is contributing the scope of the crisis:

Gordon Brown today described the crisis as having touched “the whole conscience of the world”.

He said that, while more relief planes had been allowed into the country, the situation was still “not good enough”.

“A natural disaster in Burma, by the actions of a despicable regime, has been turned into a … manmade catastrophe,” he said.

China is currently responding to its own natural disaster, demonstrating what a military can do to reach survivors in devastated areas.

From the Associated Press on May 13, 2008:

Soldiers hiking over landslide-blocked roads reached the epicenter of China’s devastating earthquake Tuesday, pulling bodies and a few survivors from collapsed buildings.

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Going to war with Burma

by twit

https://i1.wp.com/newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/44631000/jpg/_44631625_un_cyclone22670.jpgIt is a heady consequence of the Bush doctrine of preemptive warfare that it even feels tangible to think about invading a country like Burma, so I proceed with caution here. Ultimately, my point is similar to what lestro said, after finding the satellite images of the original coastline and the new shape of the country:

Why can’t we use the military to deliver aid the same way we do death?

Why is it we only need to be allowed in to help but it’s ok to just go in when we want to destroy something?

Click on the picture to toggle between the two images, via the Washington Post:

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welcome to the future

by twit

http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:p95ucgaL8pM8tM:http://www.openthefuture.com/images/things_to_come.jpg

Neurowarfare is defined, at least in part, as the “direct neurological control of weapon systems,” and the application of the technology involved includes “the control of prosthetics of wounded soldiers” and “the guidance of unmanned aerial vehicles.”

The term neurowarfare or neurotechnology may also be used to describe “the use of weapons that target the human central nervous system,” including research into “creating agents that would cause fatal overloads of bliss.”

Per a Cornell International Law Journal article, “Brave New World: Neurowarfare and the Limits of International Humanitarian Law,” DARPA has been working on “Human Assisted Neural Devices,” previously referred to as “Brain-Machine Interfaces.”

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Should the US boycott the Olympics?

vs.

Previously, in response to a report that hundreds of Tibetans have been killed since March 10, 2008, lestro wondered, “what if they hosted an Olympics and no one came?”

The conversation continues…

https://i0.wp.com/i.infoplease.com/images/blackpower.jpg

Bush: Politics not a factor in Olympics

WASHINGTON – China’s crackdown in Tibet will not cause President Bush to cancel his planned trip to the Beijing Olympics, the White House said Thursday.

… Presidential spokeswoman Dana Perino said Bush’s position is that the Olympics “should be about the athletes and not necessarily about politics.”

She said that Bush, in accepting the invitation last year from Chinese President Hu Jintao to attend the Olympics, told him the games would “shine a spotlight on all things Chinese.”

“That’s not necessarily a bad thing,” Perino added.

Bush agreed to go to the Olympics during a meeting with Hu in Australia last September during the Asia Pacific Economic Council meeting. A White House spokesman said at the time that Bush was going to the games for the sports and not for any political statement.

(image via infoplease.com via www.attytood.com)

Should the US boycott the 2008 Olympics?

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