Tibet Protest News Update

by twit

From the International Campaign for Tibet on April 3, 2008:

There have been further protests in the past few days in Tibet as the crackdown on the plateau deepens, with mass detentions in different areas and some monasteries encircled by troops.

In some areas, including Kardze in Sichuan province (Kham) and Lhasa in the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR), there are signs that the authorities are provoking further unrest and frustration by requiring local people to sign denunciations of the Dalai Lama.

According to reliable reports received by ICT, in some rural areas of eastern Tibet many Tibetans have fled villages or nomad encampments and are hiding out elsewhere to avoid arrest.

ICT also has a map of Tibetan protests since March 10, 2008:

https://i1.wp.com/www.savetibet.org/images/images/Protests_map_0325_LARGE.jpg

Previous posts:

Tibet Protest News

The Middle Way Through Tibet

“Tell the World, They Said to Us”

Should the US Boycott the Olympics?

Welcome to the future

Advertisements

Tibet Protest News

by twit

https://i0.wp.com/newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/44508000/jpg/_44508208_44503124.jpg

Protests are happening throughout China but information is difficult to find.

This post collects news reports about recent protests in China by province.

Comments with updates and links are welcome and appreciated.

Map via the BBC. A detailed map of China and its provinces is available via Wikipedia.

(Updates continue at Tibet Protest News Update, including this link to the ICT map of Tibetan protests from March 10, 2008 through March 25, 2008)

Tibet

On March 10, 2008, an estimated 300 monks march to the center of Lhasa from Deprung monastery. On March 13, monks begin a hunger strike and other protests as Lhasa’s three main monasteries are locked down by Chinese authorities.

On March 14, violent protests occur in Lhasa. On March 15, there are reports of crowds of protesters being shot by police during the March 14 demonstrations.

On March 14 and March 15, 2008, demonstrations take place in Penpo, near Lhasa. An estimated 3,000 Tibetans then join demonstrations demanding the release of detained protesters. Most monks from the Penpo Ganden Choekor monastery are then detained by Chinese authorities.

On March 16, 2008, tear gas, electric batons and gunfire drive back Tibetan protesters in Lhasa. On March 17 and March 18, widespread arrests are reported in Lhasa, as well as hundreds of deaths since March 10, 2008.

By March 19, 2008, Lhasa is reported to be quiet, with a heavy Chinese military presence.

On March 27, 2008, thirty monks disrupt a carefully coordinated tour of Lhasa in view of several journalists. On March 28, there are reports from Lhasa of hundreds of prisoners being forced into trucks and onto a train.

On March 29, 2008, there are reports of several ongoing demonstrations in Lhasa, coinciding with the visit by foreign diplomats. On March 30, “panic” is reported in Lhasa near security checkpoints.

Sichuan

On March 15, 2008, monks and other people demonstrate in Ngaba county. On March 16, an estimated 7 23 30 protesters are killed and hundreds wounded by Chinese authorities, including monks from the Kirti monastery, during a protest involving thousands of people marching towards Ngaba county government headquarters. Additional protesters are reported shot by Chinese authorities on March 18, 2008.

On March 20, 2008, widespread arrests, detentions and a ‘massacre‘ are reported in Ngaba county. On March 22, monks protest in the Chabcha area of Amdo. By March 23, food shortages are reported in Ngaba county due to the restrictions imposed by Chinese authorities.

On March 24, 2008, police fire on crowds of protesters attempting to march to a government office. On March 25, there are violent protests and reports of Chinese authorities firing on crowds of protesters in Garze, including monks from the Trehor Draggo monastery.

On March 29, 2008, it is reported that over 500 monks have been taken away from the Kirti monastery in Ngaba. On March 30, mass arrests of monks are reported at the Amdo Ngaba Buddhist School of Dialectics, Amdo Ngaba Gomang monastery, Amdo Atob monastery and the Tatsang Lama Kirti monastery.

Qinghai

Protests in Qinghai began in late February, 2008 with hundreds of people, including monks from the Rebkong monastery, demonstrating until tear gas was used by police to disperse the crowd.

On March 16, 2008, hundreds of monks march towards the government headquarters of Rebkong county and are joined by additional protesters until paramilitary troops detain the monks and use tear gas on the crowd. On March 17, China is reported to engage in ‘suppression on the run’ to contain the spreading protests and demonstrations. On March 18, monks at Rebkong monastery continue to protest by burning incense in violation of orders from Chinese police.

Thousands are reported as continuing to participate in protests as of March 20, 2008.

Gansu

On March 14 and March 15, thousands of Tibetans demonstrate in Xiahe near the Labrang monastery. On March 16, protests are reported in Machu county, including the destruction of the doors to the county government offices.

Days of unrest are reported in Hezuo, Gannan and Maqu county, including student protests and clashes with police.

On March 18, hundreds of monks and Tibetans protested in Sangchu county. On March 19, hundreds of Tibetans, including some riding horses, are reported as attacking a government building in an unnamed town.

Detentions and arrests of an estimated 20 Tibetans are reported in Sangchu county on March 21, 2008.

Beijing

A small student-led vigil is reported on March 19, 2008 to be the first reported protest in the Chinese capital.

Read more of this post

The Middle Way through Tibet

by twit

There won’t be a massive boycott of the Beijing Olympics. Whether individual athletes and other participants will boycott remains to be seen.

The Dalai Lama has suggested a “middle way” through the crisis in Tibet. The Associated Press reports on March 24, 2008:

“DHARMSALA, India (AP) – Nearly six decades of struggle against the might of China has taught the Tibetans one thing: Ask the world for little, expect less.

… They know few countries have the appetite to cross China, particularly at a time the world is counting on the emerging superpower to keep the global economy ticking as the United States appears headed into a recession.

… From the exiled Tibetan leaders, there were no calls for sanctions, like those imposed when Myanmar suppressed pro-democracy protests last year, or even a boycott of this summer’s Beijing Olympics.

It’s an approach that reflects the pragmatism of the Dalai Lama, who has long sought an accommodation based on his “Middle Way” dialogue with Beijing aimed at autonomy for Tibetans under Chinese rule.

Instead, the Tibetans appealed for international pressure on China to act with restraint, to open the area to international investigators and the media and for organizations like the International Red Cross to be allowed in to ensure wounded Tibetan protesters get treatment.

“Specific things are very difficult. No one is going to send in a peacekeeping force,” said Taklha.

The Tibetans have, however, won the moral support of many nations.

… Some argue that only international pressure has stopped China from completely crushing the Tibetans long ago.”

Read more of this post