Clinton Blames Obama for the RFK comment controversy

by twit

and who wouldn’t? Just look at what his campaign said:

“Senator Clinton’s statement before the Argus Leader editorial board was unfortunate and has no place in this campaign,” said Obama spokesman Bill Burton.

and then there’s this!

A prominent ally of Sen. Barack Obama, Illinois Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin also weighed in, telling the Associated Press: “I know Hillary Clinton, and the last thing in the world she’d ever want is to wish misfortune on anybody. She and Barack are friends.” He added: “It was … a careless remark, and we’ll leave it at that.”

and worst of all, from Senator Obama himself:

“I have learned that when you are campaigning for as many months as Senator Clinton and I have been campaigning, sometimes you get careless in terms of the statements that you make, and I think that is what happened here,” he said in an interview with Radio ISLA. “Senator Clinton says that she did not intend any offense by it, and I will take her at her word on that.”

I mean, really. These outrageous statements are over-the-top and simply uncalled for.

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Iowa II: Hillary loses again

by lestro

Iowa climbed back into the national spotlight yesterday as a second caucus (Iowa II: Iowa Harder!) was held to try and figure out what to do with the delegates won by candidates no longer in the race. Remember, if you will, that just those few months ago there were about 27 Democrats in the race, including John Edwards, who gathered up 14 delegates during his second-place finish on January 3 , 2008 (Hillary came in third).

Yesterday, the county caucuses got back together to talk about those 14 delegates since in this every-delegate-counts race, Iowans wanted to make sure every delegate was counted.

The results? Iowans still like Barack Obama better than Hillary Clinton, awarding him nine of the Edwards delegates:

Obama originally had 20 Iowa delegates while Clinton, a New York senator, had 18. The numbers represent an estimate based on the percentage of support each candidate earned on caucus night and the number of superdelegates who have endorsed them.

But on Saturday, Obama’s Iowa total climbed by nine; Clinton’s shrank by one.

I guess like everywhere else, the more that voters get to know Obama, the more they like him better than Hillary Clinton.

Iowa wasn’t the only state to award some late delegates yesterday. In California, which is somehow still counting the votes from its Feb. 5 primary, Hillary picked up an additional two delegates. Unfortunately for her, she wasn’t the only one:

Also Saturday, California’s Democratic Party finalized the delegate counts from its Feb. 5 primary. Clinton picked up two more pledged delegates, raising her state total to 204; Obama gained five, raising his figure to 166.

So according to the AP, here’s where we stand:

Counting Saturday’s new figures from Iowa and California, an Associated Press delegate tally showed Obama with 1,617 delegates and Clinton with 1,498.

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