Iowa II: Hillary loses again

by lestro

Iowa climbed back into the national spotlight yesterday as a second caucus (Iowa II: Iowa Harder!) was held to try and figure out what to do with the delegates won by candidates no longer in the race. Remember, if you will, that just those few months ago there were about 27 Democrats in the race, including John Edwards, who gathered up 14 delegates during his second-place finish on January 3 , 2008 (Hillary came in third).

Yesterday, the county caucuses got back together to talk about those 14 delegates since in this every-delegate-counts race, Iowans wanted to make sure every delegate was counted.

The results? Iowans still like Barack Obama better than Hillary Clinton, awarding him nine of the Edwards delegates:

Obama originally had 20 Iowa delegates while Clinton, a New York senator, had 18. The numbers represent an estimate based on the percentage of support each candidate earned on caucus night and the number of superdelegates who have endorsed them.

But on Saturday, Obama’s Iowa total climbed by nine; Clinton’s shrank by one.

I guess like everywhere else, the more that voters get to know Obama, the more they like him better than Hillary Clinton.

Iowa wasn’t the only state to award some late delegates yesterday. In California, which is somehow still counting the votes from its Feb. 5 primary, Hillary picked up an additional two delegates. Unfortunately for her, she wasn’t the only one:

Also Saturday, California’s Democratic Party finalized the delegate counts from its Feb. 5 primary. Clinton picked up two more pledged delegates, raising her state total to 204; Obama gained five, raising his figure to 166.

So according to the AP, here’s where we stand:

Counting Saturday’s new figures from Iowa and California, an Associated Press delegate tally showed Obama with 1,617 delegates and Clinton with 1,498.

That’s a difference of 119 delegates and a lot of ground to make up. Pennsylvania only has 158 delegates available, which means if she won 75 percent of the vote, she would make the difference, but still be behind because he would have won the other 39 delegates anyway.

In order to take the lead, Clinton needs to win 87 percent of the vote in Pennsylvania (that would give her 138 delegates out of Pennsy compared to Obama’s 20). And that seems highly unlikely, especially considering that John McCain only got 79 percent of the vote in Mississippi a week after he locked up the Republican Nomination.

You know, just so we are sure to keep this “race” in perspective and all…

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