Tell me again how John McCain isn’t part of the problem

by lestro

oh, Johnny Mac, you may not be able to lift your arms above your head, but you have proven more than adept at putting your foot in your mouth:

One of the giant mortgage companies at the heart of the credit crisis paid $15,000 a month to a firm owned by Senator John McCain’s campaign manager from the end of 2005 through last month, according to two people with direct knowledge of the arrangement. The disclosure contradicts a statement Sunday night by Mr. McCain that the campaign manager, Rick Davis, had no involvement with the company for the last several years. Mr. Davis’s firm received the payments from the company, Freddie Mac, until it was taken over by the government this month along with Fannie Mae, the other big mortgage lender whose deteriorating finances helped precipitate the cascading problems on Wall Street, the people said.

oops. Quick! backtrack!

They said they did not recall Mr. Davis doing much substantive work for the company in return for the money, other than speak to a political action committee composed of high-ranking employees in October 2006 on the coming midterm congressional elections.

So, they spent $15,000 a month on a guy who didn’t do anything for them? I think I am beginning to understand this fiscal crisis better.

What could they possibly be thinking?

They said Mr. Davis’s his firm, Davis & Manafort, was kept on the payroll because of Mr. Davis’s close ties to Mr. McCain, the Republican presidential nominee, who was widely expected by 2006 to run again for the White House.

Ahahahaha! They knew he’d run and they wanted to make sure they had his top guy on payroll! I think I saw this on the Sopranos once!

But in the incestuous world of politics and high finance, these things happen all the time, I am sure. But the real question – aside from the types of people from whom Mr. McCain is apparently getting his advice – comes when you look at the hypocrisy and lies the McCain camp has been spitting out all week:

Mr. McCain’s campaign has been attacking l Senator Barack Obama, his Democratic rival, for his ties to former officials of the mortgage lenders, both of which have long histories of cultivating allies in the two parties to fend off efforts to restrict their activities. Mr. McCain has been running a television commercial suggesting that Mr. Obama takes advice on housing issues from Franklin D. Raines, a former chief executive of Fannie Mae, a contention flatly denied by Mr. Raines and the Obama campaign.

Either he’s a flat-out lying sack of shit or is a doddering old fool who can’t keep anything straight. Those seem to be the only two possibilities considering it was just TWO DAYS AGO that he said this:

On Sunday, in an interview with CNBC and the New York Times, Mr. McCain responded to a question about Mr. Davis’s role in the advocacy group by saying that his campaign manager “has had nothing to do with it since, and I’ll be glad to have his record examined by anybody who wants to look at it.”

Apparently, someone looked at it.

Such assertions, along with McCain campaign television ads tying Mr. Obama to former Fannie Mae chiefs, have riled current and former officials of the two companies and provoked them to volunteer rebuttals of what they see as the McCain campaign’s inaccuracy and hypocrisy.

Heh heh. Reform, my ass.

At least two other people associated with Mr. McCain have ties to either Freddie Mac. The lobbying firm of the Republican that Mr. McCain has enlisted to plan his transition to the White House should he be elected, William Timmons Sr., earned nearly $3 million from Freddie Mac between 2000 and its seizure, federal lobbying records show. Mr. Timmons is founder of Timmons & Co., one of Washington’s best-known lobbying shops. The payments were first reported by Bloomberg News.

Mark Buse, Mr. McCain’s chief of staff for his Senate office, also is a Freddie Mac alumnus. He and his former lobbying employer, ML Strategies, registered to lobby for the company in July 2003, and received $460,000 before the association ended after 2004.

Tell me again how John McCain isn’t part of the problem?

2 Responses to Tell me again how John McCain isn’t part of the problem

  1. Pingback: The return of the ninja bandits « The Church of the Apocalyptic Kiwi

  2. Pingback: an encyclopedia of McCain/Palin lies and distortion « The Church of the Apocalyptic Kiwi

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